Starting on Monday, May 4th our office will return to our normal schedule and start seeing patients for routine procedures and dental emergencies.

Our Dental Hygienists will return on Monday, May 18th for dental cleanings with specific guidelines. As a precaution we are seeing half the number of patients per day for dental cleanings and implementing new safety guidelines to ensure the safety of our patients and staff. As a result, appointments will be managed to allow for social distancing, if we need to reschedule your dental cleaning our staff will be in touch with you.

Oral Health Facts You May Not Know

healthy man leaning against wall showing healthy smile

Not taking care of your oral health can lead to issues such as cavities, tooth decay, or even infection. These problems don’t just stop at your mouth, though. Oral health issues can affect your overall health in ways you may not be aware of. Here are just some of the health issues that can stem from unresolved oral health issues.

Cardiovascular Disease

Studies show a link between heart disease and gum inflammation. Periodontal disease, the most advanced type of gum disease, can enter into your bloodstream and travel down your arteries. Most importantly, it can travel down to the arteries in your heart. This can cause hardening of your arteries (known as atherosclerosis), and plaque can form on the outer walls of your arteries. That, in turn, restricts blood flow to your heart, increasing your risk for heart attack or stroke. Additionally, the inner lining of your heart can become inflamed or infected.

Dementia

If you have gum disease, like gingivitis, this can go through the nerve channels in your head or bloodstream. Some believe this may lead to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. While many Americans have gum disease, many either don’t know they have it, or are not managing it properly. If you have gum disease, it is important to have regular teeth cleanings. You should also establish a good oral health care routine at home, including flossing daily, brushing twice a day, and maintaining a good diet that includes lots of vegetables and few processed foods and sugars.

Respiratory Infections

An article published in the Journal of Periodontology suggested gum disease can lead to infections in your lungs, like pneumonia. While you may not realize that your respiratory infections are connected to your gums, think about it. Breathing in bacteria from infected gums and teeth for a long time can eventually cause problems in your lungs.

Keep Regular Dental Appointments

Your oral health is important for healthy teeth and gums, but it is also important for your overall health. Is it time to schedule your next appointment? Call our friendly team today or easily book your next appointment online!